One week later, and it’s still #Fireproof.

One week later, and it’s still #Fireproof.

32 notes
  
Dancing Butterflies, a Twice as Fancy pony, on this gorgeous Labor Day weekend. #MyLittlePony #Generation1 #mlp #G1

Dancing Butterflies, a Twice as Fancy pony, on this gorgeous Labor Day weekend. #MyLittlePony #Generation1 #mlp #G1

😳🔫

😳🔫

891 notes
  

You & I fragrance commercial (x)

You & I fragrance commercial (x)

Hah

1 note
  
Moonstone, a rainbow pony. #MyLittlePonyG1 #1984

Moonstone, a rainbow pony. #MyLittlePonyG1 #1984

20 notes
  
Right by my side, #MyLittlePony #G1 #G3

Right by my side, #MyLittlePony #G1 #G3

54 notes
  
austinkleon:

Carl Wilson, Let’s Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste

This was great. I picked it up because of Mark’s review.

mlarson:


  I read Carl Wilson’s Let’s Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste, and it’s probably my favorite book of the year so far. Like Wilson, I never cared that much for Céline Dion’s music, and hadn’t tried to care, but I came away with a new appreciation for where she came from and some of her shrewd business moves. But it’s not just about the music and industry angle, the good stuff is how he uses Dion as the pivot to talk about taste, and all the baggage that informs our opinions.
  
  
    Much of this book is about reasonable people carting around cultural assumptions that make them assholes to millions of strangers.
  


There are tons of great quotes from the book, many of which Mark already pulled out. I particularly liked this one—


  Punk, metal, even social-justice rock like U2 or Rage Against the Machine, with their emphatic slogans or individuality and independence, are as much “inspirational” as Céline’s music is, but for different subcultural groups. They are just as one-sided and unsubtle.


—which reminded me of the Neil Young vs. Billy Joel section of Faking It: The Quest for Authenticity in Popular Music.

It’s a really fun read. I kept misplacing it around the house and asking my wife, “Have you seen my Celine Dion book?” Which was pretty hilarious. Recommended.

BTW: there’s a new edition of the book that includes essays from other writers on the topic of taste.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Love this book! Essential reading.

austinkleon:

Carl Wilson, Let’s Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste

This was great. I picked it up because of Mark’s review.

mlarson:

I read Carl Wilson’s Let’s Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste, and it’s probably my favorite book of the year so far. Like Wilson, I never cared that much for Céline Dion’s music, and hadn’t tried to care, but I came away with a new appreciation for where she came from and some of her shrewd business moves. But it’s not just about the music and industry angle, the good stuff is how he uses Dion as the pivot to talk about taste, and all the baggage that informs our opinions.

Much of this book is about reasonable people carting around cultural assumptions that make them assholes to millions of strangers.

There are tons of great quotes from the book, many of which Mark already pulled out. I particularly liked this one—

Punk, metal, even social-justice rock like U2 or Rage Against the Machine, with their emphatic slogans or individuality and independence, are as much “inspirational” as Céline’s music is, but for different subcultural groups. They are just as one-sided and unsubtle.

—which reminded me of the Neil Young vs. Billy Joel section of Faking It: The Quest for Authenticity in Popular Music.

It’s a really fun read. I kept misplacing it around the house and asking my wife, “Have you seen my Celine Dion book?” Which was pretty hilarious. Recommended.

BTW: there’s a new edition of the book that includes essays from other writers on the topic of taste.

Filed under: my reading year 2014

Love this book! Essential reading.

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